How to Clean a Flask

No one thinks about cleaning a flask when they buy the flask. In fact, it’s not until after you use the flask, that most think about cleaning it. Liquor itself once bottled in a distillery has a long shelf life. In a flask, however, it lasts a matter of days - due to change in temperature, exposure to air, and movement which may bruise it.

Note: there is also the thought that once the alcohol is in the flask, it should be consumed that same day. No matter the situation, eventually every flask owner ponders the question of cleaning the flask. The small mouthpiece makes it virtually impossible to use any cloth or scrubbing utensil so how’s it done? Here are some suggestions that should help you in a pinch:

  1.  Soap – Outside only. Do not use soap on the inside it is likely to leave a residue in the flask and sour the taste of future contents.

  2. Vinegar – Plain white vinegar has been used as a cleaning agent for years. It’s inexpensive and easily found. The smell is pungent so take a deep breath prior to cleaning and trust that the smell goes away. Rinse and leave open (preferably upside down) so that the flask drains and dries completely prior to recapping.

  3. Lemon Juice – If the smell of vinegar is a bit much to bear, lemon juice is a bit more expensive but should do the trick just as well. Rinse and leave open (preferably upside down) so that the flask drains and dries completely prior to recapping.

  4. Baking Soda – In a pinch, a pinch of baking soda mixed with hot water and then used to rinse your flask should keep your flask in good condition. After the baking soda treatment, make sure you rinse with hot water and leave the flask open and upside down to dry.

  5. Good old hot water – If you are not changing content types and you alone have been drinking from the flask, a good bit of boiling water may be all you need. Remember to air dry upside down if possible prior to recapping.